View Pure is a great website to use when using YouTube videos in the class. It hides the side bars and advertisements typically shown on YouTube.

GOOGLE CHROME


Chrome is the Web Browser that functions with the Chromebooks. Therefore, it will be to your advantage to become familiar with this browser. Get familiar with the Chrome by viewing these videos... Click here







Here are some tutorials to use the Web 2.0 tools.

Create Virtual Idea Boards on Pinterest

Pinterest is great place to visually organize links and visit again later without cluttering up your Bookmark folder.
It works great for organizing personal projects and ideas. Watch the video if you want to start one. View my pinterest

http:pinterest//.com///pord_33/


How to Use Blogger Posts, Pages and Tabs







20 Twitter Hashtags Every Teacher Should Know About

(cross-posted Onlinecolleges.net)

Twitter chats are such a great way to stay connected and informed in your professional circle, and education is no exception. Through education chats, you can find out about new methods for teaching, tech resources, even jobs for teachers. Most chats are held weekly, and offer an opportunity to have a regularly scheduled conversation with like-minded educators.

Check out our collection to find a wealth of Twitter chats that are great for all kinds of educators.
General

These Twitter chats cover anything and everything in education, and represent a great jumping off point for those just getting started in Twitter education chats.

#edchat – Talk to a variety of educators around the world through #edchat, Tuesdays at noon and 7 p.m. EST.
#lrnchat – Every Thursday night from 8:30-10 p.m. EST, you can connect with other educators and discuss learning.
#edbkchat – On Wednesdays at 4 p.m. EST, you can discuss educational books and topics in learning and pedagogy.
#spnchat – Find out about successful practices in education and education reform through #spnchat Tuesdays at 9 p.m..
#ptchat – Wednesdays at 9 p.m. EST, parents and educators around the world can open the lines of communication on #ptchat.
#urbaned – This Twitter chat for educators discusses topics relevant to urban education and beyond, every first and third Sunday of the month at 9 p.m. EST.
#teachchat – Connect with other teachers and find out what they’re doing in their classrooms on #teachchat Wednesdays at 9 p.m. EST.
#teaching2030 – Discuss big picture education issues, strategies, and reform through the #teaching2030 chat, every third Thursday at 8:30 p.m..
#smedu – Wednesdays at noon and 9 p.m. EST social media professionals, students, educators, and more can discuss using social media in education in this chat.
#ntchat – New teachers can learn more about their profession with ideas, collaboration, and more for getting starting through #ntchat on Wednesdays at 8 p.m. EST.
#educoach – Wednesdays at 10 p.m. EST, you can find instructional coaching for improving education.
#gtchat – Fridays at noon and 7 p.m. EST, gifted and talented educators, administrators, parents, and students can discuss new developments in developing gifted and talented programs around the world.
#spedchat – Follow this weekly discussion on issues for students and teachers in special education Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. EST.

Administration and Behavior


Check out these Twitter chats to get connected and discuss topics concerning school administrators.


#AcAdv – Tuesdays from 8-9 p.m. EST, you can talk to academic advisors and other colleagues about advising.
#SAChat – Discuss student affairs with other professionals in the industry Thursdays from 12-1 p.m. CST and 6-7 p.m. CST.
#isedchat – Talk about independent schools Thursdays at 9 p.m. on #isedchat.
#CUAD – At 2 p.m. on Tuesdays, you can discuss college unions and activities with higher education student affairs professionals and educators.
#cpchat – Connect with other principals in this always-open chat.

Subject Chats


English teachers, librarians, and other educators in special subjects can check out these chats for great information and resources.


#engchat – At 7 p.m. each Monday, you can come together with other English teachers to discuss improving English instruction.
#DUedchat – Chat with educators Down Under in this chat each Thursday 9 p.m. New Zealand time.


20 Tips for More Efficient Google Searches

(Cross posted from http://www.dumblittleman.com)

For millions of people Google is an indispensable search tool that they use every day, in all facets of their lives. From work or school, research, to looking up movies and celebrities to news and gossip, Google is the go-to search engine.


But instead of just typing in a phrase and wading through page after page of results, there are a number of ways to make your searches more efficient.


Some of these are obvious ones, that you probably know about. But others are lesser-known, and others are known but not often used. Use this guide to learn more about, or be reminded of, some of the best ways to get exactly what you're looking for, and quickly.


Either/or : Google normally searches for pages that contain all the words you type in the search box, but if you want pages that have one term or another (or both), use the OR operator -- or use the "|" symbol (pipe symbol) to save you a keystroke. [dumb | little | man]


Quotes: If you want to search for an exact phrase, use quotes. ["dumb little man"] will only find that exact phrase. [dumb "little man"] will find pages that contain the word dumb and the exact phrase "little man".


Not: If you don't want a term or phrase, use the "-" symbol. [-dumb little man] will return pages that contain "little" and "man" but that don't contain "dumb".


Similar terms: Use the "~" symbol to return similar terms. [~dumb little man -dumb] will get you pages that contain "funny little man" and "stupid little man" but not "dumb little man".


Wildcard: The "*" symbol is a wildcard. This is useful if you're trying to find the lyrics to a song, but can't remember the exact lyrics. [can't * me love lyrics] will return the Beatles song you're looking for. It's also useful for finding stuff only in certain domains, such as

educational information: ["dumb little man" research *.edu].


Advanced search: If you can't remember any of these operators, you can always use Google's advanced search.


Definitions: Use the "define:" operator to get a quick definition. [define:dumb] will give you a whole host of definitions from different sources, with links.


Calculator: One of the handiest uses of Google, type in a quick calculation in the search box and get an answer. It's faster than calling up your computer's calculator in most cases. Use the +, -, *, / symbols and parentheses to do a simple equation.


Numrange:This little-known feature searches for a range of numbers. For example, ["best books 2002..2007] will return lists of best books for each of the years from 2002 to 2007 (note the two periods between the two numbers).


Site-specific:Use the "site:" operator to search only within a certain website. [site:dumblittleman.com leo] will search for the term "leo" only within this blog.


Backlinks: The "link:" operator will find pages that link to a specific URL. You can use this not only for a main URL but even to a specific page. Not all links to an URL are listed, however.


Vertical search: Instead of searching for a term across all pages on the web, search within a specialized field. Google has a number of specific searches, allowing you to search within blogs, news, books, and much more....






  • YouTube
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Creating Internet Presentations Voki & Glogster

How to make a Prezi

Learning to Use Prezi is easy, just check these tutorials and examples and you can create great presentations.

What is Prezi?


Prezi using frames

Prezi editing

Prezi in 3 minutes

How to create a Voki


How to create a Glogster

How to Guide ~Social Bookmarking

How to make a playlist with YouTube



Google docs 101